José Antonio Navarro is a familiar figure to historians of early nineteenth-century Mexico and especially to those concerned with the history of Texas. Born in San Antonio in 1795 and, of course, a Mexican, by the early 1830s he had married, produced a family, built a successful farming and mercantile business, and attained a prominent position in the local provincial elite. In favor of Anglo-American immigration into Texas and in contact with people like Stephen Austin, he supported the separation of Texas from the hated regime of Santa Anna. He signed the Texan Declaration of Independence and, after the de facto separation from Mexico in 1836 that was never accepted by the government in Mexico City, became “a model citizen of the Texas Republic” (p. xvii). In the next few years, he actively participated in the new republic, serving in 1838 in the congress convened at...

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