In The Imagined Island, Pedro San Miguel establishes a number of purposes for the five essays that constitute the volume. One is to extend and apply theories that reveal the fictional narratives with which historiographies are constructed. Flowing from that, the author analyzes historical visions of the colonial period. The third involves a sustained critique of the works of seven authors: Antonio Sánchez-Valverde, Pedro Francisco Bonó, José Gabriel García, Manuel Arturo Peña-Batlle, Joaquien Balaguer, Juan Bosch, and Jean Price-Mars (the last, a Haitian, is the only one not from the Dominican Republic). The dominant concern of the first four essays involves a critical examination of writings about the relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic and how the narrative, fictional frameworks of these authors produce the contrasts drawn between the two halves of Hispaniola. The critique focuses on Dominican constructions of Haiti...

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