Diego Armus’s new collection pairs original analyses with previously published work to show readers how scholarly research on the history of medicine and public health in Latin America has developed in recent years. Armus says he selected essays that focus on Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico between 1870 and 1970 because the historiography for those countries is especially rich. The articles feature topics ranging from a sensation-causing painting that depicted the 1871 yellow fever epidemic in Buenos Aires to the comparative institutional history of public health and social-service agencies in twentieth-century Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. The volume presents several carefully selected approaches to the “new” history of medicine. At the same time, it makes work previously published in Portuguese and English available to Spanish speakers and brings scholarship published in Mexican and Brazilian journals to the attention of scholars in Argentina, where the book...

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