Landscapes of Devils is a beautiful evocation of the history of Argentina’s western Toba people (also known as the Toba-Pilagá) from the late nineteenth century to the present. The author shows how the harsh climate of the Chaco Boreal, at the center of the South American continent, intertwined with memories of places and events among the Tobas, who prior to their defeat by the Argentine army in the early twentieth century were one of the most feared indigenous groups of the region. Through the natives’ understanding of the past, it is possible to understand their complex history as sugar plantation workers in Salta and as subjects evangelized by the British Anglican Church. In the process, historians can benefit from seeing the historical development of the region through the eyes of its indigenous peoples.

Gastón Gordillo asserts that memory, for the Toba, is related...

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