The bridge between Cuban scholarship and its foreign counterparts can be likened to the hanging rope bridges of the high Andes: a daunting but necessary journey for those who choose a Cuban subject for their research. Like those tenuous but firm rope crossings, too, is the relationship in Cuban historiography between periods marked off by radical ruptures. Scholars within and without Cuba tend to stay inside the perimeter of a given period, and the study of the republican period has bloomed in Cuban academia only since the 1990s.

This valuable study merits a place alongside other worthwhile contributions that transit these geographic and thematic chasms. Shaffer proposes to do for anarchism something like what K. Lynn Stoner did for feminism: that is, to restore to its rightful place in Cuban history a movement often neglected by historiography. This engaging and often passionate overview...

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