The deceptively simple concept of Latin America as a unified space inevitably breaks down upon closer inspection. This compilation of provocative and intriguing essays seeks to disentangle a number of attempts by nineteenth-and early-twentieth-century intellectuals to define the elusive commonalities of the region. Although it offers few general conclusions, the volume highlights the diverse and complex iterations of latinoamericanismo that developed in the century after independence and provides an introduction to the cultural history of Latin American transnational identities.

The book, roughly chronological, begins with two chapters discussing the minutes of professional meetings over the course of the nineteenth century. In the first, Aimer Granados recounts the ties between international politics and the linguistic transformation of americanos into hispanoamericanos during a series of international congresses beginning in Panama in 1826 and ending in Lima four decades later. While hispanoamerica had already become an...

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