Weaving the Past is an admirable attempt to synthesize the work of archaeologists, ethnohistorians, and ethnologists into a coherent history of native women in Mexico, Central America, and the central Andes. Kellogg begins with a brief introductory chapter that outlines some concepts she believes are central to the history of indigenous women (agency, gender complementarity, parallelism) and gives a cursory review of pre-Classic civilizations and the possible role of gender in these societies. A chapter on women in the late pre-Hispanic world follows, concentrating on the domestic, religious, and rare political roles of women in Teotihuacán, Nahua, Nudzahui (Mixtec), Maya, and Andean societies. Chapter 3 presents an overview of what befell women in the conquest and ensuing colonial juncture. The largest segments of the book are two chapters dedicated to the national period (one on Mesoamerica and one that covers both the Andean highlands and lowland peoples of South and...

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