The U.S.-Mexican War, although it took place more than 160 years ago, continues to shape the destinies of both the countries caught up in the conflict. For Mexico, the many problems of sharing a border with the U.S. had their origins with this war. And for the United States, the dilemmas posed by the incorporation of large populations of non-English-speaking, mestizo peoples continues to challenge the meaning of what it means to be an American. This book is a solid and useful tool for students of Latin America, who will see in this conflict a lesson of what happens when leadership gives in to ethnocentric notions of nationalism.

The authors succeed in giving a clear narrative of events without overpowering us with the many details of diplomacy and war. They have done a masterful job of synthesizing the most important interpretations of the...

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