Proclaiming Revolution is an important contribution — the first book of its kind to approach the implications and consequences of the 1952 revolution in comparison with other Latin American revolutions of similar magnitude. The book addresses — from the distance of a half century and in the heat of recent global market influences — Bolivia’s crisis of modernity and the problems it has faced in the consolidation of democracy.

The book uses important historiographic sources in order to understand the revolutionary process from the angle of the actors involved. Among the volume’s notable contributions are essays by Sinclair Thompson, Brooke Larson, and Laura Gotkowitz, who research indigenous and peasant participation in the political panorama of the 1950s. The abolition of traditional indigenous labor obligations and the establishment of universal suffrage did not just represent elements of modernization and democractization; these transformations also converted Bolivia’s indigenous population into an ethnic force...

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