In this book, Hendrik Kraay examines the regular army and the militias in the Brazilian city of Salvador, capital of the sugar-plantation captaincy, and later province, of Bahia from the 1790s to the 1840s. This conflicted period proved to be fundamental in the Brazilian state-building process. The complexity of the independence era is revealed through the perspective of military institutions, which were dominated by social groups acting at the periphery of a Brazilian society divided by many competing interests. Elite planters experienced institutional changes that seemed to threaten their racial and social dominance. The officer corps divided its loyalty between the Portuguese king and the Brazilian emperor, even as it adapted to changes in hierarchy, organization, and chain of command. Meanwhile, the whole of society was affected by wartime dislocation, racial tension, and social unrest.

Within the army’s ranks, individuals of differing classes...

You do not currently have access to this content.