With a formidable cast of historians, political scientists, anthropologists, and theologians, Edward Cleary and Timothy Steigenga’s new volume explores the intersections of religion and indigenous politics in Latin America. The contributors to this volume study the relationship between religious change and indigenous political mobilization in Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay, and Peru. These case studies amply support the editors’ thesis that “religion has fundamentally influenced indigenous culture and politics and that religion has been altered in the process” (p. 18). Accordingly, this volume engages in rich and timely discussions over indigenous political mobilization and religiosity.

The editors emphasize four themes: syncretism, the connections between religious and social movements, outcomes of mobilization, and the fluidity of religious marketplaces and politics. Like all edited volumes, this one advances somewhat unevenly in addressing these themes, though its high points are often quite high. Especially rewarding are the two chapters on Mexico, which provide...

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