This volume combines original research with historiographical essays in a manner that will be of great value to established scholars and graduate students alike. The chapters examine historical questions related to peoples of African descent and nationalism with a focus on the Caribbean, Brazil, and Argentina from the period of the Haitian Revolution through the end of the nineteenth century. It begins with a provocative essay by Lauren Derby on Dominican nationalism. Opposition to Haiti has long been an important dimension of constructions of Dominican national identity. Derby questions the perception that this opposition has its roots solely in the “Haitian occupation” of the early nineteenth century. She suggests that to understand “anti-Haitianness” we must also look to the earlier struggles over exchange, land, labor, and production that began to differentiate the places that would become Haiti and the Dominican Republic as early as the seventeenth century.

Franklin D. Knight,...

You do not currently have access to this content.