Catarino Garza was one of those fiery, dedicated (some would say wild-eyed and forlorn), romantic liberals determined to ignite a revolution that would unseat the Porfirian regime in late-nineteenth-century Mexico. Like most others of his ilk, he launched his bombast and campaign from the U.S. side of the border, but also like them he failed to arouse support below that line and watched his rebellion quickly peter out. Of course, Francisco Madero’s movement, which also got off to an uncertain start, finally toppled Díaz in 1911. But Madero was no radical liberal, and in the 20 years following Garza’s revolt, Mexico had greatly changed. Garza’s combative personality, bloated ego, and writing skills make him perhaps the most interesting of these largely forgotten revoltosos, but he should be remembered also for his spirited defense of the honor and rights of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans...

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