Uruguay is perhaps the South American country least known and studied by foreign scholars, and most Latin Americanist historians are not familiar with the country’s historiography. Zubillaga’s book is thus a rare opportunity to encounter, in one text, most of the names and titles that together comprise the nation’s rich historiographic production. However, this was certainly not the book’s main purpose.

The author, a well-known social and political historian and chair of the Departamento de Historiología of the Universidad de la República, describes and analyzes the development of history as a profession in Uruguay and its practices in institutional contexts. The emphasis on the discipline’s institutional processes, from its founding moments through its conflicts and transformations, allows him to over-come most of the usual temptations of “meta-history.” Zubillaga goes well beyond the classification of historians according to his own subjective views. In most of the chapters, he displays real historical...

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