Since the 1994 Zapatista Rebellion—an uprising of mostly Mayan Indians calling themselves the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional—scholars have produced dozens of volumes seeking to assess its origins and implications. The flow of scholarship has lost no steam as we mark the tenth anniversary of this extraordinary event, and rightly so. The rebellion’s combination of indigenous struggles for self-determination with an armed strategy was a stunning development, at a time when guerrilla movements were rare in Latin America and almost all of the region’s indigenous movements had abandoned the armed path. Although the uprising itself was a military disaster, it led to improvements in the quality of democracy and the recognition of indigenous rights in Mexico and profoundly affected debates on these topics elsewhere in the region.

In this new interdisciplinary collection, scholars and political activists intimately involved with the mobilization in Chiapas...

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