In this work, Raúl Figueroa Esquer compiles a series of dispatches from Spain’s representatives in Mexico City and Washington DC, in order to illuminate the nature of Spanish neutrality during the Texas independence crisis, Texas’s annexation to the United States, and the Mexican-American War. In an all-too-brief prologue, Esquer claims that the dispatches show that Spain’s neutrality during these gravest international conflicts had a negative effect on Mexico. Moreover, he argues that Salvador Bermúdez de Castro, Spain’s minister in Mexico City from March 1845 to August 1847, was to blame, in part, for the Mexican-American War.

Esquer believes, and the dispatches show, that Spain did not recognize Texas independence for two powerful reasons. Spain only recognized Mexico as an independent state in 1836 and established full diplomatic relations in 1839; it did not want to endanger that nascent relationship. Second, the reasonably close proximity to Cuba made independent Texas a...

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