The historiography of the Mexican Revolution has been dominated by regional studies for some time now. Detailed analyses have focused attention on the states and personalities of Morelos (Emiliano Zapata), Chihuahua (Pancho Villa), Sonora (Alvaro Obregón), Yucatán (Salvador Alvarado), Veracruz (Adalberto Tejeda), and Michoacán (Lázaro Cárdenas), to name a few. Missing from this list is the crucial state of Coahuila, home to arguably the two most important figures of the revolution: Francisco Madero and Venustiano Carranza. The Spirit of Hidalgo aims to fill this gap in the historiography, detailing the experiences of Coahuila before and during the revolution. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, Pasztor describes life on the Coahuila frontier, divided into four zones: the Texas border, the central mining areas, the Laguna cotton district, and the capital of Saltillo. Despite their differences, these four zones shared common characteristics that predated the changes wrought during the Porfiriato. Most importantly,...

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