Veracruz has not figured prominently in Mexican historiography of the 1910 revolution because it hosted neither major grassroots uprisings nor key military conflicts. Karl Koth’s objective is to fill the void by integrating this regionally complex state—with its rich oil resources, prosperous export agriculture, and strategic ports—into Mexican national history. He takes a revisionist approach, framed within a centralist-federalism paradigm, to unravel the unfolding political struggles between the capital and the provinces during the Porfiriato and the revolution. Although he is particularly concerned with peasant and working-class resistance to centralizing tendencies, socioeconomic processes play a secondary role in his political analysis.

Three fundamental arguments underpin this monograph. Veracruzano federalism challenged the long-term centralizing processes that resulted in the construction of the modern Mexican nation-state, which culminated in the 1927 crisis. Federalism viewed the Constitution of 1857 as the guarantor of state sovereignty, and the Anti-Científicos best exemplified this perspective in...

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