Civil war in Guatemala, especially the atrocities and widespread slaughter that took place in highland Maya communities in the early 1980s, triggered massive displacement and prompted thousands of people to flee the country for a safe haven beyond its borders. The Maya of Morganton adds to a growing body of literature that documents the Maya diaspora throughout Mexico, the United States, and Canada. Fink’s nuanced account demonstrates how exodus from Guatemala resulted in a resilient network of refugees in a most unlikely setting—Morganton, North Carolina, “a usually quiet industrial center of sixteen thousand people perched at the edge of Great Smoky Mountains” (p. 1). This, however, is far more than an accomplished contribution to studies of migration and acculturation. With skill and compassion, he contextualizes the experiences of the Maya of Morganton in ways that deepen our understanding of political struggle, labor organization,...

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