This is an excellent study of the Ñudzahui people—more widely known as the Mixtecs—during the colonial period. This monograph is firmly in the tradition of the UCLA school of colonial Spanish American studies, which likes to call itself the “New Philology” because of its practitioners’ extensive utilization of indigenous-language documents as their primary source. Like most of the products of the “New Philology,” this one spends a great deal of time on language and writing. These are topics of great interest to philologists, although not necessarily to the general reader. These cover the first third of the book, after which Terraciano turns to a detailed analysis of the nature of Ñudzahui settlements, suprafamilial social structures and relations, lordship and elites, land and land tenure, religion, and ethnicity. Throughout these chapters, the author pays close attention to the role of gender in history and...

You do not currently have access to this content.