Some 20 years ago, Dirk Raat edited an eclectic, two-volume set of documents examining the Mexican nation-state. Mexico: From Independence to Revolution, 1810– 1910 (University of Nebraska Press, 1982) and (with William Beezley) Twentieth- Century Mexico (University of Nebraska Press, 1986) included entries ranging from Agustín de Iturbide’s Plan of Iguala to a comic strip by Abel Quezada, and for many years the volumes were a staple in undergraduate study. Raat and Beezley’s choice of documents also captured a historiographical moment in Mexican studies. Taken as a whole, the selections conveyed a somewhat traditional understanding of the Mexican nation-state as a bounded, nationalist project forever struggling to overcome the odds of foreign intervention and economic and cultural imperialism.

We are now at a very different historiographical moment, to which the present collection is excellent testimony. As Gilbert Joseph and Timothy Henderson state early...

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