Women’s critical role in the 1973 ousting of Salvador Allende has long been recognized, but their actions, motivations for participation, and foreign ties remained obscure. Many believed that only privileged women, manipulated by rightist men, mobilized against Allende’s government, but Margaret Power’s examination of the gendered aspects of rightist political participation and electoral campaigns answers these questions and dispels the myths.

In the nineteenth century, women pressed for suffrage in order to protect the church against liberal anticlericalism. Once women attained the right to vote, they were mobilized by rightists attempting to attract a popular base. The 1964 electoral alliance between the rightist Partido Nacional (PN) and the centrist Christian Democrats (PDC) used the “Scare Campaign”—convincing women that a leftist victory would mean destruction of the family—to help defeat Allende. The PN used this strategy again in 1970, but Allende won the three-way...

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