Louise Haagh argues that Chile’s restored democracy failed to grant social citizenship to labor in the 1990s because of the constraints of the neoliberal economic model inherited from Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973–90). This failure manifested itself in the inability to resurrect strong union rights or to implement training programs for workers that would enable them to take advantage of atomized market opportunities. As a result of continuing inhibitions on labor’s freedom and preparation for mobility, “occupational citizenship” (p. xxiii)—the capacity to work and live productively—was realized only partially at best. Thus, T. H. Marshall’s classic prediction that political citizenship would lead to social citizenship (Citizenship and Social Class, 1949) did not hold true. The recapture of democratic freedoms proved insufficient to secure major social rights and conquests.

This book concentrates on the first new democratic government, led by Patricio Aylwin (1990–94). Committed...

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