Every serious student of Latin America will sooner or later learn of the seminal importance of the Hispanist Marcel Bataillon (1895–1977). Grateful acknowledgments to Bataillon, starting with Robert Ricard in 1933, stud many of the enduring works on colonial Latin America. Indeed, Bataillon’s works have shaped understandings of the Iberian colonization of the New World for the past 70 years. Initially interested in mentalities of the sixteenth-century Iberian Peninsula, Bataillon became increasingly drawn to the New World as demonstrated in his later works. This collection of essays, organized to celebrate the centenary of Bataillon’s birth, is grouped around three basic areas of his work: his close historical readings of la literatura aurisecular, his studies on the influence of northern Humanism (most particularly the works of Erasmus) upon sixteenth-century Spain, and his critical readings of the contemporary chronicles, histories, and polemics of the conquest and colonization of the New World....

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