This book represents a missed opportunity. A polemicist in a hurry, McLaren does not provide an adequate analysis of the thought of either Ernesto Guevara or Paulo Freire. He does argue strenuously for the need to create a “pedagogy of revolution,” which presumably would involve an attempt to transform popular consciousness on a grand scale so that the vast majority of the world’s population could become “self-reflexive” agents “of struggle” (p. 88). His goal is to criticize contemporary capitalism, and not to analyze Guevara and Freire as historical actors.

It should hardly be surprising that this book will fail to satisfy historians, since they are not its intended audience. Since this review is intended for historians, and not educational theorists, I will address issues of primary interest to historians. There is no denying that Paulo Freire was Latin America’s most significant educational theorist...

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