Many historians would cringe at the thought of attempting to rewrite the history of U.S. postwar political culture by focusing on, say, Hulk Hogan, Fritz the Cat, and Social Distortion. This is essentially what the contributors to this volume propose for the case of postrevolutionary Mexico. The editors ambitiously describe this collection as “the first real attempt to relate issues of representation and meaning to questions of power in a history of Mexico since 1940” (p. 14). From a postrevisionist perspective, they seek to deconstruct the concept of lo mexicano by examining the culture of Mexico’s imagined “golden age” of prosperity, modernity, and political consensus. Combining innovative cultural and transnational theory with traditional political analysis, this important book represents a new direction in Mexican historiography in the United States. It also reflects the interests (and biases) of a new generation of Mexicanists, mostly...

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