Pablo de Olavide (1725–1803) was an American-born jurist, who became intendant of Seville, Spain, during the early reign of Charles III. The first son of a prominent limeño merchant, who had generous financial backing, Olavide enjoyed a meteoric ascent through the educational and administrative systems of Peru, receiving his appointment as oidor of the Royal Audiencia at age 20. Despite its promising start, Olavide’s career failed to sustain the smooth sailing to which it at first seemed destined. The limeño suffered from an uncanny ability to self-destruct, although he commanded an equally astonishing ability to recuperate. An enlightened, courageous apostle of modernization, Olavide soon made enough enemies in Peru to find life intolerable. Taking refuge in Spain, he married so well that he could soon lay claim to the Intendancy of Andalusia in what was indeed a rare achievement for a creole. Remarkable...

You do not currently have access to this content.