Since the appearance of his 1993 Inventing America: Spanish Historiography and the Formation of Eurocentrism, José Rabasa has emerged as a leading voice among scholars studying early modern/colonial historiography—principally that of the sixteenth century—from an interdisciplinary, subaltern studies perspective. This new volume consists of an introductory essay, six chapters, and an epilogue; four chapters revise journal articles published between 1993–97, and thus much of the material here will be familiar to scholars following Rabasa’s work. Although some of the revised pieces—chapter 5 on Garcilaso’s La Florida del Inca, for example—retain the feeling of self-contained essays, Writing Violence on the Northern Frontier does a very good job of bringing together earlier studies with new ones to form a cohesive and significant reflection “on the conjunction between writing and violence that grounded the Spanish conquest of the Americas in the sixteenth century and...

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