In this very interesting work, Mark Anderson examines various aspects of the coverage of the Mexican Revolution in the U.S. press. The title is misleading. He includes far more than just the dramatic figure of Villa, looking at the coverage of Mexicans and attitudes toward them much more broadly. Further, he goes well beyond the headlines. Analysis of propaganda machines (we would now call them media relations programs) in the various revolutionary camps, the interests behind the various U.S. news organizations he investigates and their motives in their coverage of Mexico, and the prevailing stereotypes that colored and informed the content of news reports and cartoons make this work far more valuable than the title would indicate.

The Mexican Revolution took place in the very shadow of United States, with much of the action near the U.S.-Mexican border. Attitudes of various actors in...

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