To say that questions surrounding the formation of a sense of nationhood in the Dominican Republic have haunted Dominican historiography might be too strong a statement, especially from one who studies precisely this issue. Yet, for the past 15 or 20 years, historians of the eastern part of Española, whose western third belongs to Haiti, have troubled themselves enough with the sources of Dominicanness and with the watersheds in its development to have allowed the theme, if not to dominate the conversation, then at least to intrude upon it frequently. The volume under review collects original essays by scholars who have examined these questions over the years, from the inside and abroad, and using a variety of theoretical and methodological tools. It contains the best and most complete coverage of the issues yet in print, and its intellectual reach will probably not be...

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