On February 17, 1583, Diego Sánchez lay dying of a knife wound in the church hospital of Culhuacan, a lakeside town not far from Mexico City. There, with the aid of an Indigenous scribe, Diego dictated his final will and testament in his native language, Nahuatl. Though Diego was mostly concerned with earthly matters, his final wish was to be remembered: “macamo nechilcahuazque,” “let them not forget me” (p. 206). More than four centuries later, Diego's wish has been fulfilled. His will is one of the 65 Nahuatl testaments preserved in the Libro de testamentos de Culhuacán, a rich set of documents that has been central to the study of the Nahua of central Mexico for the last half century. Sarah Cline and don Miguel León-Portilla first published the testaments in English translation as the inaugural volume of James Lockhart's Nahuatl Studies Series. That 1984 publication, and Cline's subsequent...

You do not currently have access to this content.