Peter B. Soland's Mexican Icarus is the first scholarly monograph published about Mexican aviation history. It examines the country's first decades of aeronautics from the outbreak of the Mexican Revolution in 1910 to the entrenchment of civil air travel during the post–World War II era. Soland provides keen analysis of the political and cultural context, influences, and ramifications of aviation. He argues that Mexican pilots and political leaders embraced indigenismo in the marketing of planes and squadrons but that this appropriation was in practice a continuation of nationalistic settler colonialism. He also argues convincingly that pilots became performative examples of a Mexican masculinity with origins in older ideas about honor and bravery that adopted the values of technological savvy, rationality, and modernity espoused by revolutionary and postrevolutionary government officials. While making these cases, he provides insights about Mexican labor and class, foreign relations, infrastructural development, and cinema. He shows how...

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