Of the many new works that have begun to uncover the cultural history of the Cold War from the vantage point of critical peripheries, Masha Salazkina's new book is perhaps one of the most comprehensive and accessible to cover the movement of ideas through Soviet spaces of Afro-Asian exchange. It examines a key strategy of internationalist solidarity, that of creating cultural affinities and intimacies, between different parts of what Salazkina calls the “socialist world,” through the use of cinema.

The main focus of the work is the Tashkent Festival of Cinemas of Asia, Africa, and Latin America and the many cinematic universes that came into contact through its participants. It is organized around two major objectives: describing the evolution of the festival, its early selections and accomplishments, and taking a look at key themes that emerged both intellectually and politically through festival programs. One chapter carefully explores women's and gender...

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