This is an intellectual biography of Brazilian physician and geographer Josué de Castro. His career and influence are deployed to narrate an alternative history of geography, decentered from assumptions about the discipline that are grounded in Anglo- and Francophone scholarship. Despite his own formal training in medicine, Castro embraced geography because it was inherently interdisciplinary and encompassed a range of approaches to inquiry, suitable for the study of chronic malnutrition. In his native region of northeast Brazil, Castro viewed the colonial plantation economy as the root cause of socioeconomic relations that fostered chronic hunger, with sugarcane monoculture crowding out more nutritious food crops.

Archie Davies's research—including at archives and specialized libraries in Brazil, Argentina, and Europe—is inspired by Castro's articulation of an anticolonial and humanist geography of hunger, which Davies sees as a precursor to Anglophone political ecology. Castro believed that people suffer from hunger not because of nature's failings...

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