This short microhistory examines the border-crossing biography of Pedro de Medina, who was arrested, tried, and punished by the Portuguese Inquisition in Lisbon in 1657–58 for having sex with another man. This study is largely based on the analysis of a single primary source: Medina's Inquisition trial records, which are preserved in Lisbon's Instituto dos Arquivos Nacionais. Medina's multiple confessions before the Inquisition allowed inquisitors and, generations later, historians to piece together his transimperial travels. The Mexico City–born Medina left New Spain for the Philippines as a soldier in the service of the Spanish Empire. Medina recounted that he was captured by Moros (as the Spanish referred to the Islamic polities in the southern Philippines and the Sulu Sea with whom they were at war) and then trafficked into slavery in India. The Dutch rescued Medina from his Muslim enslaver, and after five years in the Dutch service, he was...

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