The history of piracy has matured considerably in recent decades, spurred perhaps counterintuitively by global pop culture. Surplus fiction seems to drive hunger for true pirate stories, both in Asia and in the West. One may also credit the wild frontier of cyberspace, where good and evil battle at the speed of light. But piracy, like cybercrime, is only as good as its infrastructure, its hosts and enablers. This is the premise of Arne Bialuschewski's concise yet sweeping history of buccaneer encounters with Indigenous Americans. Relations ranged from intimate to inimical, yet the famous pirates of the later seventeenth century would have been helpless without Indigenous allies, hosts, guides, pilots, cooks, paddlers, bunkmates, and sailors.

From the start, Bialuschewski discerns which Indigenous groups and individuals accommodated (or resisted) European and mixed marauders. When the sources allow, he names names. Among the most interesting individuals to emerge from the documents is...

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