The book under review significantly advances our understanding of the intertwined narratives of mining and environmental history. This work, distinguished by its concise chapters and lucid prose, offers a compelling exploration of the mining cycles in Cerro de San Pedro, a small mining town in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

One of the book's notable strengths lies in Daviken Studnicki-Gizbert's capacity for conducting long-term analysis, transcending conventional periodizations. Historians often concentrate on specific time frames without engaging with research from different eras, thereby constraining their comprehension of phenomena such as the one identified by the author in this book: a recurrent pattern characterized by boom, depletion, and renewal cycles across more than four centuries. This cyclical phenomenon, intricately linked to technological advancements and capital availability, bears profound socioenvironmental ramifications. Conducting a study of this scope necessitates a sophisticated methodology that involves managing an extensive array of primary sources, spanning from colonial...

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