The legacies of African slavery occupy the center of contemporary debates about race and democracy in the Americas. Reckoning with what Saidiya Hartman popularized as the “afterlife of slavery” has pushed scholars to question the finality of abolition and explore the ways in which racial subjugation outlasted the institution's legal life to thwart equality in the present. The Boundaries of Freedom makes a welcome contribution to this debate by demonstrating that its leading edge is taking place in Brazil. In this deeply researched collection of almost 500 pages, editors Brodwyn Fischer and Keila Grinberg showcase the new directions in the social historiography of Brazilian slavery—namely, its slow death. A group of renowned sociocultural and legal historians based in Brazil and the United States explores Brazil's experience as the site of a remaking of slavery alongside the intensification of the transatlantic slave trade and the formation of the largest population of...

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