Yarí Pérez Marín's examination of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century medical works aims to contextualize the literary and scientific contributions of Spanish writers with experiences in early colonial Spanish America. The work includes analysis of four medical practitioners with varying levels of education and training: Pedro Arias de Benavides, Alonso López de Hinojosos, Agustín Farfán, and Juan de Cárdenas. Studying these authors helps to counter teleological narratives of supremacy in knowledge production. Pérez Marín argues that these practitioners viewed themselves as “voices within a larger conversation on health and the human body” who “contest[ed] the supremacy of emerging marginalising colonial structures” (p. 6). Frustratingly, the imperial motherland failed to see these contributions in the same light.

Drawing from extensive primary source material and in-depth historiographical analysis, Pérez Marín offers a contextual interpretation of colonial and imperial discourses that shaped the acceptance, rejection, or ambivalence toward works of science and medicine produced in...

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