Pablo Yankelevich's recent book Los otros: Raza, normas y corrupción en la gestión de la extranjería en México, 1900–1950 scrutinizes Mexico's relationship with foreigners in the national territory from the end of the Porfiriato to the postwar period. The study will appeal first and foremost to historians, but it will also be of use to scholars of migration both to and from Mexico, the national tourism industry, and race and ethnicity in early to mid-twentieth-century Mexico. Rather than organize his study chronologically, Yankelevich uses each chapter to trace specific topics from the Porfiriato to the 1950s.

Chapter 1, “Ante el yunque de la patria,” builds a conceptual framework that grounds early twentieth-century immigration policy within the context of postrevolutionary mestizophilia. Building on the work of Manuel Gamio, Yankelevich notes that immigration posed certain problems to the Indigenous/European binary. The state identified “races”—particularly Chinese, Black, Jewish, and eastern European—that, it believed,...

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