This book examines the cultural basis of an agrarian insurgency between 1977 and 1984 in Huitzilan, located in the northern mountains of Puebla, Mexico. By examining Nahua rituals and mythical stories about rain gods, James Taggart compellingly argues that Nahua cultural values radicalized Nahuas to take political action against mestizo elites. This led to the insurgency known locally as the UCI, which stands for the Unión Campesina Independiente (Union of Independent Farmers).

A history of community strife between mestizos and Nahuas helped the UCI organizers to turn fantasies of rebellion into a reality, but it was the stories of rain gods that served as a blueprint for how to do so. At the heart of this study are stories of rain gods who collectively organized to attack water-dwelling animals (achane), the nonhuman companions of non-Nahua settlers and local authorities who...

You do not currently have access to this content.