The Guatemalan Revolution (1944–54) looms disproportionately large within twentieth-century scholarship. This pivotal democratic period stands alone, bookended by military dictatorships and the 36-year civil war (1960–96), with its genocidal violence against Indigenous peoples. Precisely why and how this brief era of democracy, referred to as the Ten Years of Spring, continues to resonate within Guatemalan national memory is the fundamental question asked by the edited collection Out of the Shadow. The contributors ask how and why this brief era of democracy has reverberated in the 1996 peace accords' aftermath, out of the shadow of the 1954 coup and Cold War counterrevolution. These scholars excavate internal, political, cultural, social, racial, and geographic dynamics to present a more nuanced panorama indicative of the often contradictory aims of many revolutions in many places.

This collection situates itself within a monumental historiography, scholarly trends that...

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