Every new generation of historians formulates new questions to interrogate the past and provides new answers to existing ones. Drawing from a renewed Atlantic historiography that in recent decades has emphasized interimperial ties and networks and from recent discussions about Afro-Cubans' place in their nation's history, Elena A. Schneider's award-winning The Occupation of Havana provides a bold reinterpretation, rooted in new and exciting findings, of the city's British occupation in 1762–63.

Structured chronologically to discuss the occupation's origins, events, and aftermath, the first part of the book interprets the occupation as the logical culmination of an Anglo-Spanish imperial rivalry that developed to the rhythm of the slave trade to Jamaica—an island captured by the British from the Spanish in 1655. The War of Jenkins' Ear, which took place between 1739 and 1748, contributed to the dynamics of this rivalry and served as...

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