For readers in eighteenth-century Spanish America, the Gálvez family requires little introduction. The patriarch of the clan, José, has been well known at least since Herbert Ingram Priestley's landmark study early in the twentieth century. José's nephew Bernardo won sufficient glory with his stunning victory at Pensacola to have gained posthumous recognition as an honorary citizen of the United States. Bernardo's father, Matías, became viceroy of New Spain. And José's two other brothers, Miguel and Antonio, were also men of substance. The Gálvezes derived from the obscure Andalusian village of Macharaviaya, near Málaga. Their story is a spectacular example of a dynamic individual's rise, along with his family, from the intermediate ranks of society to the Bourbon administrative elite. In the present volume, Manuel Hernández González unravels the story behind the Gálvezes' rise to prominence and provides excellent insights into the interplay...

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