Hiding in Plain Sight is a new contribution to the study of African descendants in the Río de la Plata and one of the few works in English to examine continuities and transformations in race relations from the late colonial to the early national period. The title refers to the relative success that some African-descended women and their families from the province of Córdoba achieved in “whitening” their social status and erasing their African and mixed-race past. In Erika Edwards's analysis, a number of mulata and parda concubines, wives, and mothers “negotiated their own invisibility” as a result of a conscious generational strategy to ascend to whiteness and claim the social privileges restricted to those publicly recognized to possess a white identity (p. 2). Like Ann Twinam in her study on whiteness in Spanish America secured through the colonial gracias al sacar...

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