A century after Herbert E. Bolton brought Anglo-American historians' attention to the so-called “Spanish borderlands,” Danna Levin Rojo and Cynthia Radding have compiled a thorough and far-reaching volume of interdisciplinary scholarship on borderlands that preceded and emerged from Spanish and Portuguese imperial projects. Although similar compilations have been published over the past quarter century, some mentioned by Levin Rojo and Radding in the introduction, none has been nearly as comprehensive as this work (p. 17). The handbook's introduction encapsulates broader trends in borderlands studies since the closing decades of the twentieth century, particularly the shift in focus from interstate borders to intercultural spaces, the attention to Indigenous agency and resilience, and the emphasis on multipolar exchange over binary opposition. Its 34 chapters do not simply showcase these trends; they collectively lay the groundwork for significant conceptual shifts in future works.

Part of...

You do not currently have access to this content.