In this brief but illuminating history, Anton Daughters examines the continuities and changes experienced by the islanders of Chiloé, an archipelago in southern Chile, over the course of some 500 years. Through seven chapters the author draws from travel narratives, secondary literature, and oral interviews to understand how islanders understand themselves, their past, and perhaps their futures. Early chapters cover the archipelago's history and introduce key themes of interest. Daughters begins with the archipelago's Indigenous inhabitants, focusing on the Huilliche, a group related to the Mapuche of mainland Chile. In the Huilliche the author locates the origins of what he sees as one of the most important and distinctive cultural practices in the archipelago: a reciprocal labor practice called the minga. The minga could be a one-for-one labor arrangement, or it could refer to larger-scale work parties, but in either case...

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