The siege of Pensacola in the spring of 1781 was Francisco de Miranda's baptism of fire as a participant in Atlantic revolutions. The victory of the Spanish army, in which he served as an officer, ended British control of West Florida and reversed one of the losses that Spain had sustained in the Seven Years' War. This siege was more than yet another Anglo-Spanish military encounter. It was also a chapter in the American Revolution, as historians have only recently begun to stress. This collection of predominantly interesting essays explores Spain's role in that revolution.

While some of the chapters are too short (not counting notes, two are of nine pages, one of eight pages) to make more than a tangential contribution, the ensemble of remaining essays offers a mosaic that adds several new insights. The editors, Gabriel Paquette and Gonzalo M....

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