The nineteenth-century Brazilian Atlantic frontier is the central focus of Yuko Miki's pathbreaking book. In this region, which encompasses eastern Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo, and southern Bahia, the Portuguese crown prohibited colonization of the nonlittoral sections for over 300 years. This changed in 1808, when King João VI opened these territories for conquest and settlement. As a result, ancient civilizations were decimated, a verdant rain forest was turned into a semiarid desert, and barbaric slave regimes were established. One of the great contributions of Frontiers of Citizenship is to document this plunder, about which most Brazilians have little knowledge. Miki's book also invaluably brings to light the historical depth of various facets of the Brazilian sociocultural terrain. It details the neocolonial desire to emulate Anglo modes of modernity, the construction of Brazilianness in opposition to nature and indigenous people, macroeconomic policies rooted...

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