Cara Anne Kinnally's Forgotten Futures, Colonized Pasts builds on the premises of Benedict Anderson's seductive nation as imagined community paradigm and constructively destabilizes them. She examines the literature of “Greater Mexico,” conceived as a capacious “contact zone” riddled with ethnic and class tensions and warped by the presence of a contentious border and the disproportionate weight of the United States. She explores how some elite Mexicanos imaginatively reconstructed this space and their place within it. They took up their pens, not to forge a nation but to envision a relationship between the United States and Mexico that was founded not on antagonism, usurpation, oppression, and hopeless asymmetry but on cooperation and common interests. Others, having remained on the other side of the painful line drawn in 1848, laid claim in writing to being white, civilized, and modern enough to be welcomed as...

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